Infinity Scarf Two Ways

decor & DIY

Update your wardrobe this fall with a little DIY. These two infinity scarf DIYs are super simple to make - whether you sew or not! Creating a new infinity scarf, or ten, can be super simple with these easy-to-follow DIYs.

Homemade Infinity Scarf two ways to make them - No-sew and Low-Sew!

Super Easy No-Sew Infinity Scarf

We'll start with the simple no-sew scarf.

Supplies for a No-Sew Infinity Scarf

  • T-shirt
  • Large ruler
  • Rotary cutter or scissors
  • masking tape

Supplies for no sew infinity scarf

Start by laying out your shirt. Using your masking tape, mark a couple inches from one edge along the entire length of the shirt.

Tape a line down the entire shirt, an inch from the edge.

Remove the bottom hem of the shirt, and cut off the top of the shirt at the armpits as well. Then cut 1.5" strips into the shirt without cutting through the tape line.

Cut into strips and remove the top and bottom edges.

Stretch out the loops on the shirt.

Stretch the loops of the shirt into a scarf.

You can finish here, or add a little more. Use the hem of the shirt, then wrap around the side of the scarf where the strips are joined.

Wrap hem around to finish the scarf as desired.

Tie in a knot, and you're all done!

Knot the hem to finish the scarf

Enjoy your easy, no-sew infinity scarf!

Low-Sew Infinity Scarf

If you'd like to tackle making an infinity scarf on your sewing machine, this is simple to do.

Supplies to Create a Low-Sew Infinity Scarf

  • 2 pieces of fabric, 1/4 yard (NOT fat quarters, but full quarter yard cuts of fabric)
  • Rotary cutter
  • Ruler

Directions to Make a Homemade Low-Sew Infinity Scarf

Stack the two fabrics on top of each other so that the folds line up. Cut a 10" strip through both with your rotary cutter, then cut off the selvedge (the edges - shown here on the top).

Cut fabric pieces for low-sew infinity scarf

Lay the two strips, right-sides-together, then stitch down each long side.

Stitch sides on sewing machine

For garment sewing, traditionally we use a 5/8" seam. If you're a beginning sewer, line up the edge of the fabric with the edge of the presser foot as you sew. This will keep your stitches straight.

Once you've stitched both the long sides, turn the fabric tube right side out. Lay it on your table, and fold each end in towards the middle. You can sew it like this, or, if you like the two-tone infinity look, put a twist on one side, as shown in the photo.

Twist one end to create a two-toned scarf

Match up the raw edges, right sides together, and start pinning around.

Match ends together and pin.

Keep pinning as far as you can - you won't be able to pin all the way around, because the fabric will get in the way.

Pin around joined ends

Stitch on your sewing machine - but only where the pins are. You won't be able to stitch all the way around. That's okay.

Remove the pins as you sew, then pull the fabric back through. Your ends will be completely joined, except a few inches.

The open hole left after machine sewing most of the scarf's opening

Tucking the seam allowance inside, it is time to close up the hole. You can do this with hand stitching, or you can sew it closed on your sewing machine.

Taking care to ONLY stitch through the 4 layers of fabric at the hole, stitch about 1/8" from the edge to close up the hole. Stitch back-and-forth at the beginning and end of your line of stitching to lock your stitches (keep them from unraveling later)

Wtitch hole closed on sewing machine

You'll barely notice this line of stitching on your completed scarf.

Stitch the hole closed on your scarf - it won't be noticeable

Your scarf is done! Homemade scarves make perfect one-of-a-kind gifts or fashion accessories. See brilliant ways to wear these fall fashion accessories. And then make a bunch to use on different days of the week, or make several to give as gifts.

What colors will you make your scarves?

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A crafty mom of 2 active boys, Carolina prefers sewing, gluing, and painting to doing laundry and dishes. She has been sewing since she was 6, quilting since she was 12, and can't remember a time she wasn't creative. X-rays have proven she doesn't have an un-crafty bone in her body! Find her at 30 Minute Crafts .com and Always Expect Moore.com, or on social media using the links to the left.

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